.’. DEAD MAN’s WALK .’.

London’s macabre past is always something that takes my attention. I read few books about the crazy stories of ghosts and plagues that surrounds the City and just for fun….let learn a little about.

At the far side of the courtyard, there is an ancient brick wall. Behind this wall is part of a narrow passageway, which once belonged to the infamous Newgate Prison and was called Dead Man’s Walk. It was along this grim, covered passageway that hundreds of condemned prisoners walked to their trials and executions. Their bodies were later buried in limestone beneath the flagstones in the passageway.

This is where the dreaded ‘Black Dog of Newgate’ has been seen over the centuries. The Dog is thought to date back to the time of King Henry III (1216-72), when there was a famine in London and people were starving. The inmates of Newgate Prison were even more desperate for food, with many resulting to cannibalism to stay alive.

During this time, a young man, imprisoned after being convicted for sorcery, was murdered and eaten by the inmates. After his murder, the terrifying apparition, with its ravenous and hungry jaws, appeared to the murders, hunting them down and driving them crazy.The Dog returned to haunt the Prison on the eve of execution.
Beware as you watch, for the large black shape of the Dog can still be seen on dark nights, walking along the wall, clambering down into the courtyard menacingly, before melting away into the darkness. A nauseous stench fills the air as he passes and there is an eerie sound of the heavy, dragging footsteps, reminiscent of condemned prisoners walking to their deaths.

Keep watching closely, for you may also catch a glimpse of the ghost of Jack Sheppard, the legendary 18th Century robber and highwayman – his ghost has been seen jumping down from the wall, as if he was making one of his amazing escapes from prison, for which he became famous.

Another of the many ghosts haunt Dead Man’s Walk is that of the evil Amelia Dyer. The ‘Reading Baby Farmer”, as she was called, murdered babies, whom she had been paid to look after, by drowning them in rivers. In her way to her execution in 1896, she told the Chief Warder that she would meet him again some day. Years later, one evening, the Warder was horrified to see an apparition of her face staring at him. The vision disappeared, leaving only a handkerchief on the flagstones of Dead Man’s Walk.

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