.’. Dr. Johnson’s House .’.

London loves Dr. Johnson – it’s hard not to be seduced by a man who said: “You find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sie, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can …

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London loves Dr. Johnson – it’s hard not to be seduced by a man who said: “You find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sie, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.”

Like most people living in London, Dr Johnson wasn’t a native; he was from Midlands city of Lichfield and arrived in London in 1737 aged 28, after a disastrous career as a schoolteacher. He sraped a living for the next  thirty years writting biographies, poetry, essays, pamphlets and parliamentary reports and after nine years of work, Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language was published in 1755, it had a far-reaching effect on Modern English and has been described as “one of the greatest single achievements of scholarship.” The Dictionary brought Johnson popularity and success. Until the completion of the Oxford English Dictionary 150 years later, Johnson’s was viewed as the pre-eminent British dictionary.

The house itself is remarkable as one of the few remnants of Georgian London left in the City. Built in 1700, Dr. Johnson lived there from 1748 until 1759, after it fell into disarray and was used variously as a hotel, a print shop, and a storehouse, until it was eventually acquired in 1911 by MP Cecil Harmsworth, who restored and opened it to the public.

The house/museum is amazing inside and you have the feeling of living at that time with all the Georgian clothes you can try it on and sometimes you kind of imagine while looking trought out the window that at any time Dr.Johnson coming back from one of his trips to the pub near by “Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese”.

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Author: Dani Middleton

I was born in Brazil in 1981 and lived there for 23 years before emigrating to the UK in 2005. I had read about England’s history since a young age however I moved here purely due to the history of London itself. Everything in this city fascinates me; from its parks, pubs and buildings to street names, post boxes and bollards. Watching children “beating the bounds” or the rose ceremony, you can never be tired of London. I love the quirkiness of the little alleys, the secrets of the forgotten architecture and how wonderful it can be to simply turn a corner and suddenly find a whole new world. I have worked in some remarkable places in London: museums, palaces, galleries, archives, even digging for the MoL on the Thames foreshore but I now work for Tower Bridge where, daily, I can see the City from a different point of view. Working for the City, learning its history and stories makes me eager to learn more. London is a flowing, living organism, with the old and new together transforming it every day, but always with its history at your fingertips. One step, an intricate Victorian coal hole; another step, an old Police box; yet another, an office block built seamlessly onto an old roman ruin. I am just a girl, lost in London trying not to find the way out but a way deeper, further inside what makes this city so… special, so… unique, so… me. I am a Londoner.

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