.’. Bunhill Fields .’.

The name Bunhill is thought to have been derived from “Bone Hill” as the area has been a burial site for over thousand years. By the time it closed for burials in 1854 around 123.000 people had been buried here. There are over 2.500 memorials prov…

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The name Bunhill is thought to have been derived from “Bone Hill” as the area has been a burial site for over thousand years. By the time it closed for burials in 1854 around 123.000 people had been buried here. There are over 2.500 memorials providing a history of memorial design.

Between all the burials you can find the great artist and poet Willian Blake, the author Daniel Defoe and many of the Cromwell family.

Bunhill Fields are an oasis of calm and greenery gardens and looking at the tombs around me I wonder the story off many that rest here.

For example, the story of Willian Bousefield (on photo) that seems to not be bother and decided to put both wifes to rest together.

Also I would love to know were the whole of one of the tombs (on photo) can take us? Places like Bunhill are full of stories and mysteries and that is what turns these place into a magical world.

Author: Dani Middleton

I was born in Brazil in 1981 and lived there for 23 years before emigrating to the UK in 2005. I had read about England’s history since a young age however I moved here purely due to the history of London itself. Everything in this city fascinates me; from its parks, pubs and buildings to street names, post boxes and bollards. Watching children “beating the bounds” or the rose ceremony, you can never be tired of London. I love the quirkiness of the little alleys, the secrets of the forgotten architecture and how wonderful it can be to simply turn a corner and suddenly find a whole new world. I have worked in some remarkable places in London: museums, palaces, galleries, archives, even digging for the MoL on the Thames foreshore but I now work for Tower Bridge where, daily, I can see the City from a different point of view. Working for the City, learning its history and stories makes me eager to learn more. London is a flowing, living organism, with the old and new together transforming it every day, but always with its history at your fingertips. One step, an intricate Victorian coal hole; another step, an old Police box; yet another, an office block built seamlessly onto an old roman ruin. I am just a girl, lost in London trying not to find the way out but a way deeper, further inside what makes this city so… special, so… unique, so… me. I am a Londoner.

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