.’. John Betjeman .’.

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Sir John Betjeman, (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Who’s Who as a “poet and hack”.

He was a founding member of the Victorian Society and a passionate defender of Victorian architecture. Starting his career as a journalist, he ended it as one of the most popular British Poets Laureate to date and a much-loved figure on British television.

He led the campaign to save Holy Trinity, Sloane Street in London when it was threatened with demolition in the early 1970s.  He fought a spirited but ultimately unsuccessful campaign to save the Propylaeum, known commonly as the Euston Arch, London. He is considered instrumental in helping to save the famous façade of St Pancras railway station, London and was commemorated when it re-opened as an international and domestic terminus in November 2007.

He called the plan to demolish St Pancras a “criminal folly”. About the station itself he wrote “What [the Londoner] sees in his mind’s eye is that cluster of towers and pinnacles seen from Pentonville Hill and outlined against a foggy sunset, and the great arc of Barlow’s train shed gaping to devour incoming engines, and the sudden burst of exuberant Gothic of the hotel seen from gloomy Judd Street.” On the re-opening St Pancras in 2007, a statue of Betjeman by Martin Jennings was erected in the station at platform level.

 

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